NRA 2021 Disability Summit Agenda

DISABILITY VIRTUAL SUMMIT AGENDA 

SPONSORED AND HOSTED BY THE NATIONAL REHABILITATION ASSOCIATION  WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 2021 

PRESENTATION NUMBER 1 START AND END TIMES



6:00AM – 7:15AM PT 

7:00AM – 8:15AM MT 

8:00AM – 9:15AM CT 

9:00AM – 10:15AM ET 

PRESIDENT’S WELCOME AND UPDATES



Rebecca R. Sametz, Ph.D., CRC, NCC, LPC, VRT, ETS, CMCC 

Assistant Professor/Program Director, Texas Tech University Health Sciences  Center Lubbock 

President, National Rehabilitation Association 

Lou Adams, M.A., National Disability Institute 

President Elect, National Rehabilitation Association 

DeAnna Henderson, Ph.D., LOC, NCC, CRC 

Past President, National Rehabilitation Association 

This presentation will include a welcome to everyone attending the Disability Summit.  During this time, the President will go over progress made towards the 2021 strategic  plan, and next steps for the NRA. 

PRESENTATION NUMBER 2 START AND END TIMES



8:00AM – 9:30AM PT  

9:00AM – 10:30AM MT 

10:00AM – 11:30AM CT 

11:00AM – 12:30 PM ET 

CEU’s: 1.5 General Credit 

ADVOCACY AND LEGISLATIVE UPDATE – NAMRC AND NRA ADVOCACY AND LEGISLATION  COMMITTEE



Lou Adams, M.A., National Disability Institute 

President Elect, National Rehabilitation Association 

Judy Smith, B.A., Arkansas Rehabilitation Services 

Board Member, National Association of Multicultural Rehabilitation Concerns  (NAMRC) 

This is a joint presentation between the National Association of Multicultural  Rehabilitation Concerns (NAMRC) and the NRA Advocacy and Legislation Committee  (Public Policy Committee). The Advocacy and Legislative Committee will share an  overview of the Biden Administration’s approach to Disability issues and pending  legislation in the US House and Senate related to the Mission of NRA. NAMRC will  update the memberships on issues related to Voter Rights, Voter Suppression and Police  Reform and the intersectionality nature of these issues related to disability, race,  ethnicity, LGTBQ, gender, and socioeconomic status.  

Presentation attendees’ views on these and related issues are important and welcomed  during the session. The intended result is to inform our members of current issues and  to seek guidance from the membership for NAMRC and the Advocacy and Legislation  Committee (Public Policy Committee).

BREAK



This is a scheduled break with no presentation during this time. 

10:00AM – 10:45AM PT  

11:00AM – 11:45M MT  

12:00PM – 12:45PM CT  

1:00PM – 1:45 PM ET 

PRESENTATION NUMBER 3 START AND END TIMES



11:00AM – 12:30PM PT  

12:00PM – 1:30PM MT 

1:00PM – 2:30PM CT 

2:00PM – 3:30PM ET 

CEU’s: 1.5 Ethics Credit 

ETHICALLY AND CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE RESILIENCE PRACTICES IN REHABILITATION  COUNSELING 



Michell Temple, EdD., CRC, NCC, CCTP, CTMH, LPC (GA), LPC/MHSP (TN) Tusculum University 

Immediate-Past President of the National Association of Multicultural  Rehabilitation Concerns  

Resilience is defined from multiple perspectives. Major researchers in the field of  resilience highlight the need for people’s capacity “to withstand shock without  permanent deformation lies in the universal human experience of adversity which  includes trauma (Bonanno, 2005, p. 136). Luther (2006, p. 742) defines resilience as a  “process reflecting relatively positive adaption despite experiences of significant  adversity or trauma.” People have situations in their lives where their sense of safety,  control, belonging, and worth are violated deeply. Yet not all people decompensate into  psychopathology. Some researchers such as Yehuba as cited in Southwick et al. (2014,  p.5) recognized that people exhibit resilience engage in a process of “reintegration of  self that includes a conscious effort to move forward in an insightful integrated positive  manner as a result of lessons learned from an adverse experience.” 

ETHICALLY AND CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE RESILIENCE PRACTICES IN REHABILITATION  COUNSELING - CONTINUED FROM PG 3.



These people appear to experience what Bonanno (2005) described as “relatively mind  and short-lived disruptions” with a seemingly stable trajectory of healthy functioning  across time. Panter-Brick & Leckman (2013) interjects into the definition that people  who demonstrate resilience have benefited from a harnessing of resources that sustain  wellbeing. Thematically, researchers agree that resilience describes both universal and  culturally specific positive adaption after adversity or trauma (Bonanno, 2005; Buse &  Burker, 2013; Quintana, 2012). The interactive ethics presentation builds on the current  body of resilience research. It is designed to increase vocational rehabilitation  counseling professionals' capacity to cultivate resiliency in people with disabilities using  a culturally and ethically responsive approaches (Gibson, 2006; Gill, 1997; Atkinson,  Morten, & Sue, 1998; CRC, 2019).  

The workshop will begin by situating resilience practices within the CRCC Code of Ethics  (A.2.a, A.4, B.1.d.) from a human development and a vocational rehabilitation  counseling perspective. Next, the participants will expand their knowledge of social  identity development and racial/cultural identity development to help then approach  client progress through services as an opportunity to foster resiliency (Turner & Tajfel,  1986; Wilson et al., 2019). Participants will leave with practical clinical tools to improve  their practice to apply the CRCC Code of Ethics and improve employment outcomes of  clients from underserved and culturally diverse backgrounds. 

Learning Objectives: 

Connect the CRCC Code of ethics (A.2.a, A.4, B.1.d.) and resilience research and  practice as method to increase cultural responsiveness. 

Articulate two current research findings that identify resiliency practices of Black,  Indigenous, People of Color with disabilities 

Practice utilizing resilience-based counseling skills by applying the CRCC Code of  Ethics (A.2.a, A.4, B.1.d.).

PRESENTATION NUMBER 4 START AND END TIMES



1:15PM – 2:45PM PT  

2:15PM – 3:45PM MT 

3:15PM – 4:45PM CT 

4:15PM – 5:45PM ET 

CEU’s: 1.5 Ethics Credit 

HUMAN TRAFFICKING: A PUBLIC HEALTH CRISIS?


Rebecca R. Sametz, Ph.D., CRC, NCC, LPC, VRT, ETS, CMCC 

Assistant Professor/Program Director, Texas Tech University Health Sciences  Center Lubbock 

President, National Rehabilitation Association  

Julie St. John, Dr.PH., MPH, MA, CHWI, Associate Professor/Assistant Dean Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Abilene  

DJ Gililland Jr., EdD, LAT, ATC, Assistant Professor, Texas Tech University Health  Sciences Center Lubbock 

This presentation will provide an overview of human trafficking and the impact within  the country and internationally. With human trafficking training becoming a topic that  many healthcare professionals need to see additional training in to maintain licensure  and/or certification, this presentation will look at assisting healthcare professional in  

identifying human trafficking. The role of the counselor will be examined as it related to  the Certified Rehabilitation Counselors (CRC) Code of Ethics and what this means for  counselors who may suspect a client involved in human trafficking.  

CRC CODE OF ETHICS 

A.1.e Autonomy 

B.1.e Respect for Confidentiality 

B.1.f Explanation of Limitations 

B.2.a Serious or Foreseeable Harm and Legal Requirements 

D.1.d Avoiding Harm

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